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3 Easy Ways To Meditate With Your Child

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Yoga, meditation, wellness routines… All ideas we typically reserve for adults but, here at The Little Yoga House we're on a mission to change that mentality. Adults are not the only ones that benefit from a well-rounded wellness routine, our children need it too. Today we're focusing on 3 easy meditation techniques to practice with your kiddos.

3 Easy Ways To Meditate With Your Child

To start, what is meditation?

Meditation is a specific technique in finding stillness in the mind - a state of consciousness that is totally different from the normal waking state. It does not magically happen in just a few attempts. It takes years and years of practice to get your mind to be clear, relaxed and inwardly focused.

Meditation for children can look very different from adult meditation. Our approach to meditation for children helps prepare them to get to this level of awareness when they reach their teens and young adulthood. We teach stillness in the body first then stillness in the mind.

Meditation is practised through concentration games and guided imagery and can start as early as age 2 (toddlers). The use of props is very beneficial for ages 7 and under. At about age 7, they will start to understand the concept of stillness in the mind.

Here Are 3 Ways To Meditate With Your Child:

COUNTING MEDITATION (AGES 7 AND UP)

  1. Sit in a comfortable seat or lie on your backs

  2. Try to count to either 10 or 20 without letting a thought pop into your head

  3. If a thought comes in, you have to go back to 1

  4. Give your chid a few minutes and then ask if anyone made it to 20

FLOATING BUBBLE MEDITATION (AGES 2 AND UP)

  1. Have kids lie on their bellies with their hands under their chin

  2. Place the floating bubble timer in the centre of the circle or in front of them and flip it over

  3. Have kids focus on the bubbles as they fall to the bottom of the container

  4. CHALLENGE-Ask them to choose just one of the colours of the bubbles to focus on

  5. Remind them that this activity is done quietly and to be as still and focused as possible

  6. When the bubbles are all at the bottom of the container, ask what/if they thought about anything during this activity

POWER MINUTE (AGES 2 AND UP)

  1. Use a sand timer from a board game or purchase on at our North Austin Studio. You can find them from one minute up to an hour!

  2. Depending on the age group, you can start with a 1-minute timer and then have them build up to longer times.

  3. Place timer in the middle and have yogis find stillness in their voice, body, and mind until all the sand falls to the bottom.

posted Nov 14, 2018 by Vijay Vardhan

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Did you know that one in five people these days are affected by mental illnesses such as anxiety and depression? These days many of us are also struggling with stress and overwhelm as the pace and demands of life increase.

I believe now more than ever we all need to commit to making our mental health a priority.

In honour of World Mental Health Day, here are seven proven tips that will improve your mental health and boost your wellbeing.

https://mrsmindfulness.com/7-keys-improve-mental-health/

1. EXERCISE REGULARLY

It’s well known that exercise is important for keeping our bodies healthy, but did you know that exercise is also vital for good mental health? Research shows that people who exercise regularly have better mental health, reduced risk of developing mental illness and greater emotional wellbeing too.

HOW EXERCISE BOOSTS YOUR MENTAL HEALTH

  • Exercise increases your energy levels both mentally and physically.
  • Exercise helps you sleep better, and good sleep helps regulate your emotions.
  • Exercise can improve confidence and self-esteem as you achieve a healthy goal and take care of yourself.
  • Exercise changes hormones and chemicals in the brain in mood boosting ways including an ‘endorphin rush’ that increases feelings of calm and happiness as well as improving focus and memory.
  • Physical activity can be an outlet for irritation, frustration and bad moods.
  • Exercise is a powerful way to alleviate the symptoms of mental illness. For example research suggests exercise can be as effective as medication or speaking to a psychologist for overcoming mild depression.

THINK ABOUT STARTING SMALL

Keeping physically active doesn’t have to mean working out at the gym, it can be simply going for a walk in the park. Experts advise that at least 20 to 30 minutes of exercise at least five days a week is ideal. If you’re not currently exercising why not start small with a goal that feels immediately achievable – like just 5 to 10 minutes a day. Start small and you can build up from there. This is often the best way to form new habits.

2. PRACTICE MINDFULNESS

Mindfulness (a form of meditative awareness) involves training our attention and learning to have a more wise and skillful relationship with our own minds. Mindfulness teaches us to unhook from unhelpful and unproductive thought patterns and behaviours. It involves learning to steady our awareness in the present moment rather than getting lost in our heads worrying, ruminating about problems or locked into self-criticism or negative judgements.

RESEARCH SHOWS THAT MINDFULNESS

  • Reduces stress, depression and anxiety
  • Increases stress resilience
  • Brings feelings of peace and inner calm
  • Improves relationships
  • Improves overall sense of wellbeing and life satisfaction

3. EAT A HEALTHY DIET

What we eat affects how we feel. If you’ve ever watched how quickly sugar can have an effect on the mood of small children (and adults too) or if you’ve ever felt dull and tired after a heavy lunch of carbs you’ll have seen and felt the effects that foods we choose to eat can have.

But it’s not just sugar and heavy carbs. All kinds of foods can also have short-term as well as long-lasting effects on your mental health.Your body needs a mix of nutrients and minerals to function well, so making sure you’re eating a good diet is truly vital for mental health.

A HEALTHY DIET INCLUDES

  • A variety of fresh vegetables and fruits
  • Nuts and seeds
  • A good source of protein, from either fish meats (from good sources) or plant-based
  • Regular water consumption 6- 8 glasses per day
  • Potentially dairy, grains and complex carbohydrates like beans, lentils, pumpkin etc

TRY TO LIMIT

  • How much caffeine you drink
  • How much sugar is in your diet
  • Taking in a lot of intoxicants
  • Things you are intolerant or allergic to

4. DRINK IN MODERATION

Many people who overindulge in drinking alcohol (or other substances) commonly do it to change their mood. Although it may numb or overcome a difficult feeling for a while, the effects are short-lived. Alcohol doesn’t deal with the causes of difficult feelings or solve our problems. It makes them worse. There are much healthier ways of dealing with difficult feelings including the other ones listed in this post.

Occasional drinking in moderation is quite healthy and enjoyable for most people. As a useful guide to drinking in moderation, keep in mind that the daily alcohol limit recommended by alcohol.gov.au is no more than two standard drinks per day.

5. PRACTICE SELF-COMPASSION

Do you have a harsh inner critic? It’s common to beat ourselves up and berate ourselves but research shows this habit of self-criticism comes at a price: It makes us lose confidence, feel unhappy with our lives and even leads to depression and anxiety.

Self-compassion is a way of relating to ourselves more kindly and studies show it makes us happier and gives us better overall emotional wellbeing (as well as a whole host of other benefits too)

In a report published by three German psychologists, which examined 79 studies on the link between self-compassion and well-being, they reached this conclusion: People who are kinder to themselves tend to be happier.

Kristin Neff, who has been a pioneer in the study of self-compassion says, “With self-compassion, we give ourselves the same kindness and care we’d give to a good friend.”

You can try some exercises to learn greater self-compassion as well as some guided meditations here.

6. KEEP IN TOUCH

We humans are social animals. We crave to feel connected and supported and to feel valued by others. Studies have shown that social connection is a vital key to good mental health.

Good social connection has even been linked to having a longer life. In one study on an elderly population people with strong social and community ties were two to three times less likely to die during the nine-year study.

Sometimes social connection can be a heart-to-heart talk over coffee but sometimes it can be a short phone call, or an email or message. Make sure to make time to connect with the loved ones in your life on a regular basis.

If you feel your current social life isn’t giving you enough connection, you can take steps to form new ones such as

  • Enrol in a class or hobby that interests you. You’ll be able to connect with others who share a common interest as well as getting out there and trying something new.
  • Join a book club, hiking club or other group such a knitting, meditation groups, fitness groups, community gardens or mothers groups.
  • Try volunteer work. Not only will you bond with other volunteers and recipients but helping others gives you that warm fuzzy feeling too.
  • Reach out and connect to people. Ask people out for coffees, dinners or to events like movies or bands. Try to get out and meet new people.

7. DO SOMETHING YOU LOVE

What activities do you love doing just for the fun of it? You know the ones you really lose yourself in? Take some time each day to do things you love and just enjoy yourself.

It could be engaging in a hobby like music, art, gardening or going hiking or riding a bike. It could be just having a cup of tea in the sun. Take some time each week (or even each day) to just enjoy life and let go of all your cares and worries for a while. Research also shows that it improves confidence and self esteem as well as improving our overall sense of wellbeing.

We don't provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. See additional information.
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