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The Use of Plywood in Construction

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The Use of Plywood in Construction

Plywood has become one of the most popular building materials, thanks to its useful properties such as ability to withstand moisture and high strength. Despite being robust and versatile, plywood remains affordable and durable for small businesses. A quick glance at the different types of plywood will reveal their importance.

From kitchen cabinets, floorings, and walls to furniture: the entire construction industry revolves around plywood. The use of plywood will only continue to increase as the global market grows because of lack of affordable and reliable alternatives.

Use of Plywood in Construction Engineering

The most prominent use of plywood is in structural applications. Plywood can naturally withstand a lot of stress and full weather exposure. Structural plywood is best used for beams and hoardings, but it is commonly used in crates, bins, internal structures, outdoor furniture, and boxes. Structural plywood is used for wall and roof bracing.

There are several plywood grades in the market, the most common and popular being A-grade which can take some serious beating. It is not uncommon for highly durable boards to withstand continuous boiling without delaminating. However, there is marine plywood which is made with glues that are completely weatherproof and boilproof.

It is also common to use B-bond grade structural plywood. This obviously comes at the cost of durability, but the material is sturdy enough for use in exterior door skins and concrete formwork.

There’s also C-grade plywood, which is un-sanded and likely to have several minor defects that will need to be repaired. C-plywood is used in cases where appearance and durability aren’t that important, such as subfloors and garages. At the very low-end of the spectrum is D-grade plywood, which is un-sanded and guaranteed to have defects that haven’t been repaired. D-grade plywood is identifiable by obvious discoloration and sanding defects.

It is common for manufacturers to pair up different grades of plywood to save on costs. The most popular example is BC-grade, which is a mix of B-grade plywood on one side and C-grade on the other side.

i) Exterior Plywood

As the name suggests, exterior plywood is used outside the house in items that require some serious durability. This type of plywood is bound together using water-resistant glue that doesn’t wear off easily. Some of the most suitable applications for exterior plywood are walls, roof linings, stables, and even outdoor floorings.

ii) Interior Plywood

In this type of construction, aesthetics and appearance take priority. This is because the foundation of the walls and roofs are already laid out, requiring minor aesthetic touch-ups. Interior plywood is not very resistant against outdoor elements and tends to degrade quickly when exposed to moisture and heat.

Some of the popular applications for interior plywood include indoor furniture, interior cladding, and ceilings.

What are Commercial Plywood – It's Types and Sizes

Plywood is considered to be the cheapest and the best alternative to wood for making furniture, cabinets, paneling and even in industrial applications. It is because plywood is strong and impact resistant to a certain extent and it is available in easily workable sheet form when compared to wood.

Enquire Now for Plywood

What is commercial plywood?

There are different grades of plywood. The commercial plywood is the standard plywood that you can access in any hardware store when you ask for plywood. The commercial plywood is usually a grade of plywood that is quite cheap because it is manufacturer out of veneers or slices of woods called the ply which is glued or bonded together under high pressure. The commercial plywood is also termed MR plywood where MR denotes moisture resistant. This means that the plywood can withstand a fair amount of dampness, humidity, and moisture. The commercial plywoods are made with different types of veneers that are popular in a particular geographical location. You have commercial plywood made of Rubber veneers in the south whereas, you have veneers made of eucalyptus in some other place.

Locate: Plywood Suppliers and Manufacturers in India

On the basis of manufacturing of commercial plywood, you do have a commercial plywood type called the Alternate commercial plywood. This refers to the type of plywood that is manufactured using two different species of veneer. For example, Fir and Eucalyptus veneers or any other such combination can be used to make commercial plywoods.

posted Apr 20 by Bop13mo

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The Safe Use of Extension Cords in the Lab

Essential to modern life and a familiar part of our surroundings, yet often not treated with deserved respect. Run over, walked on, crimped in windows and doors, left out in sun and storm alike, strung together, bent, yanked, and strung across rooms and under carpets, strewn across wet grass and through holes in walls, taped up and snarled in tangles that would give a sailor nightmares. Used in the office, in the lab, and in the field, taken for granted until you need one. What are we talking about? American UL power cords, one of the most indispensable tools we use today, but too often with little consideration. And, sometimes used in a fashion that could have disastrous results.

 

In 1997, more than 12,000 people were treated for electrical shocks and burns; about 2,500 of them were treated for injuries stemming from extension cords.1 In addition, each year about 4,000 injuries associated with electric extension cords are treated in hospital emergency rooms. Half of these injuries involve fractures, lacerations, contusions, or sprains from people tripping over extension cords. Roughly 3,300 home fires originate in extension cords each year, killing 50 people and injuring about 270 more.2 However, with a little care and some precautions, these conveyors of power can be used safely.

 

 

We must caution up front, that if you have more than a few Europe VDE Power Cords powering equipment in your lab, it is probably time to either call an electrician to install additional strategically placed outlets, or to rearrange equipment. Likewise, if you have any cords running through walls, up through the ceiling and down somewhere else, an electrician is definitely required. Extension cords should only be used when necessary and only for temporary use. You should always plug equipment directly into a permanent outlet when possible. Where this is not possible, however, you should begin by selecting the right cord for the job.

 

Indoors or outdoors, the use of extension cords serve different needs and should be selected accordingly. Regardless of location, always use the three-prong type of cord approved for either indoor or outdoor use. In addition, the cord should have a certification label from an independent testing lab such as UL (Underwriters Laboratories) or ETL (Electrical Testing Laboratories) on the package and attached to the cord near the plug.

 

The amount of current a cord can handle will depend on the diameter of the conductors (copper wire part of the cord). Cords that contain more copper can safely handle more power. The wire size is measured by the gauge of the wire. You will usually find numbers like 16, 14, or 12 gauge on an extension cord package and the cord itself. Now, this is one of those confusing issues. You would think that a 16-gauge wire is bigger than a 12-gauge wire, but it’s not! As the number gets smaller, the thickness of the conductor gets bigger. A 12-gauge wire can safely carry much more power than a 16-gauge wire. Compare the capacity on the label to the intended load.

 

Always use the shortest extension cord possible, to minimize risk of damage to the cord and reduce electrical resistance across the length of the cord. Extension cords, by the nature of their length and conditions of use, are much more prone to damage than other types of wiring. It is important to check the total length of the cord for damage before putting it into use.

 

One should start by looking at the ends of the cords. The male end—the end with the three prongs that fit into an electrical outlet—is the one that is most prone to damage. The two flat power-conducting prongs are subject to bending, while the round prong (often called the ground pin), can be broken off. Without the ground pin there is no path to ground through the wires—potentially a very dangerous situation.

 

Outdoor use extension cords, and many equipment cords, have a tough outer layer designed to protect the inner wires. If the outer jacket is damaged, the softer inner insulation around the wires can easily become damaged as well. Does this mean you should whip out the tape to repair it? No, damage to an extension cord jacket, or any cord for that matter, should never be fixed by wrapping it with tape. Even electrical tape does not have sufficient strength or abrasion resistance to make a permanent repair as required by OSHA. A taped-up extension or power cord to a piece of equipment is an easy OSHA citation.

 

So, what to do if you have a damaged cord? If the damage is extensive, cut off the plug and throw it out. Replace it with a new cord. Alternatively, the cord can be cut at the point of damage and a new plug installed. Too many times, especially if the female end is damaged, we see outlet boxes intended for structural use installed on the extension cord. These are not permitted if the box is designed to be surface mounted. The clues to easy identification are indentations (knockouts) on the side about the size of a nickel and small holes on the back. Instead, use hard-walled outlet boxes that are approved for use on a flexible cord.

We don't provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. See additional information.
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