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7 Types of Industrial Storage Tanks Explained

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7 Types of Industrial Storage Tanks Explained

Industrial storage tanks are containers used for storage of gas, oil, water, and petrochemical products, employed for industrial uses. Industrial storage tanks come in different sizes and shapes.

They can be underground, horizontal, and vertical, and be made from concrete, stone, fiberglass, steel or plastic.

Industrial storage tanks can be categorized into several types based on the substance they hold and some other factors.

1. Industrial Fuel Storage Tanks

Industrial fuel storage tanks, known as petroleum tanks also, can store various fluids. In general, they are used for storing non-organic and organic liquids. They can also hold vapor as well as different flammable fluids. Fuel storage tanks are manufactured in various designs and sizes. They are designed to store a variety of fuels, vapor, and industrial liquids.

Types of Industrial Fuel Storage Tanks

There are two main types of fuel storage tanks – Aboveground tanks and Underground tanks.

Aboveground Fuel Tanks

Aboveground fuel tanks (AST) are quite popular because of their lower long-term maintenance and upfront costs. These tanks are more cost-effective to install compared to underground tanks since you don’t need to spend for backfilling, deep excavation, and pavement of more involved piping.

Aboveground fuel tanks offer greater ease of maintenance compared to the below ground tanks. You can check them easily for leaks and access for repairs. This is the reason aboveground fuel storage tanks are preferred for storing fuels and chemicals.

Underground Storage Tanks

In Underground storage tank (UST), at least 10% of the tank’s stored volume is buried underground. Such tanks that are used for storing hazardous materials or fuels are regulated, and must have registration with the EPA.

These tanks are suitable for people wanting to maximize the space and/or value of their property. Underground storage tanks can be put beneath lawns and driveways, where they are not visible. Arguably, these types of tanks are safer as the chance of explosion is very little. However, the chance of leaks as well as that of generating pollution is increased in case of these tanks as they cannot be inspected often.

2. Industrial Chemical Storage Tanks

Industrial chemical storage tanks are employed for storing fertilizers, propane, liquefied natural gas, petroleum products (gasoline, diesel), crude oil, and other chemicals. Industrial chemical storage tanks are available in various shapes and sizes. These storage tanks are used for mixing, processing, static storage, and transport of finished chemical products as well as raw materials.

Types of Industrial Chemical Storage Tanks

There are three chief types of industrial chemical storage tanks available –

? Stainless steel tanks
? Polyethylene tanks,
? Fiberglass (FRP) tanks

Stainless steel storage tanks are effective and durable; however, they are not suitable for many acids as well as are the most expensive option.

Fiberglass tanks are suitable for some applications. However, they have seams that may leak, need increased maintenance, more prone to human error as they are handcrafted, and are susceptible to certain chemicals such as hydrofluorosilicic acid – a chemical which etches glass (FRP’s structural component).

Polyethylene storage tanks come in cross-linked as well as linear polyethylene, and make the most versatile industrial storage tanks in the market.

Consider the Chemical to be Stored

When planning an industrial chemical storage tank unit, the most important factor to consider first is the chemical to be stored. It’s wrong to believe that if a storage tank can hold water, it can hold a chemical too. While a water storage tank might hold a chemical for some time, remember that the tank has not been designed specifically to store the chemical. Several factors may degrade the tank, causing leaks and leading to other hazards.

Fortunately, polyethylene industrial storage tanks can handle any chemical type that you want to store. Polyethylene chemical storage tanks are affordable, sturdy, and strong. Polyethylene storage tanks are made in a mold that rules out the likelihood of human error. Moreover, these tanks are available in various options which help in protecting your storage environment, the chemical, and your employees.

The chief types of polyethylene materials used for chemical storage tanks are – Linear Polyethylene and Cross-linked Polyethylene (XLPE).

Safety Concerns for Chemical Tanks

A failed or damaged chemical tank can lead to serious property damage and environmental contamination. If chemical storage tanks spill or leak, the chemicals stored may flow into streams and lakes, contaminate groundwater and drinking water, or catch fire. Chemical fire can lead to contamination of water and soil as well as pose threats to human health.

Failure of chemical storage tanks may occur due to deterioration or corrosion, construction flaws, poor maintenance, spills during transfers, overfills, and lack of or improper containment for leaks.

3. Industrial Oil Storage Tanks

Oil storage tanks are reservoirs or containers that hold oil temporarily during the different phases of processing into oil products of various types, or before it’s consumed or used. The materials and structure of industrial oil storage tanks are based on their application as well as the safety, environmental, and legal requirements of other kinds in the storage area.

Oil storage tanks in different sizes, shapes, materials, and types are employed from crude oil’s initial production to the distribution and refining of different petroleum oil products.

Modern industrial oil storage tanks come in the materials – carbon steel, stainless steel, reinforced concrete, and plastic. They are also carved on rock salt deposits that are mostly impermeable, for underground storage of oil. Various oil storage tank types have been built over time.

Types of Industrial Oil Storage Tanks

Floating Roof Tank

As the name suggests, the floating roof tank consists of a floating roof which falls or rises according to the level of oil in the tank. To prevent the build-up of vapor inside the tank, the floating roof in this type of tanks has been incorporated as a safety feature.

Fixed Roof Tank

In the fixed roof tank, the oil stored is not exposed. This tank type is employed for holding oil products in lower volumes than in case of tanks having floating roofs.

posted Feb 18 by Wpp06ui

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soda-lime glass, lead glass and borosilicate glass. These three types of glass make up around 95 percent of the cullet glass used in the production process. The remaining 5 percent of glass is special-purpose glass.

Soda-lime glass

Soda-lime glass is the glass produced in by far the largest quantities of all mass produced glass types. As the name indicates, the main constituents in addition to sand are soda and lime. A typical soda-lime glass contains 71 to 75 percent sand (SiO2), 12 to 16 percent sodium bicarbonate (Na2O), 10 to 15 percent lime (CaO) and small quantities of other substances such as dyes. Soda-lime glass is used to make bottles, food jars, simple drinking glasses and sheet glass products. Soda-lime glass is light permeable and has a smooth, fine-pored surface, making it easy to clean. It also expands very quickly under the influence of heat so care should always be taking when putting hot water into a soda-lime glass container.

Crystal glass

Crystal glass looks beautiful when cut as a result of its high refraction index. It has a far higher density than soda-lime glass. In our everyday lives, we use crystal glass to make drinking glasses, vases, bowls, ashtrays and decorative ornaments. Its composition is 54 to 65 percent sand, 13 to 15 percent alkali oxide and several other oxides. Glass containing more than 18 percent lead oxide is also known as lead crystal glass. However, lead oxide is hardly used today in glass production. Crystal glass only accounts for less than 0.5 percent of total tableware glass production in Germany.

Special glass

Special glass is used for special technical and scientific applications. Its composition can vary and it includes numerous chemical elements. Examples of special glass are lenses, glass products used by the electrical and electronics industries and glass ceramics.

How is curved glass made?

Manufacturing curved glass is a time-consuming, highly specialised job. You could almost say it's a ‘pane' to produce.

Workers cut the sheet of glass to size and then clean and polish it, using a UV lamp to check for dust or impurities (any rogue particles would cause the glass to crack or shatter). They construct a steel mould shaped to the curve radius and dimensions of the desired piece. To stop the pane sticking to the mould, the glass is painted with a mixture of detergent and calcium carbonate.

Then, it is placed on the mould and loaded into the kiln. The manufacturers crank up the heat to 700°C, hot enough to loosen the bonds between the silica molecules so that the glass starts to soften and bend to the profile of the mould. Once in shape, the glass is gradually cooled over a period of about two hours.

What It Means to Temper Glass

Tempered glass, or toughened glass, has been heat-treated to make it stronger and safer to prevent injury in case if it ever breaks. In fact, tempered glass is four to five times stronger than annealed, or untreated, glass. In the event of breakage, tempered glass fractures into small, relatively harmless pieces rather than jagged shards.

Most of the glass that you see in commercial and residential spaces has been tempered. Common applications include side and rear windows in vehicles, entrance doors, shower and tub enclosures, racquetball courts, patio furniture, microwave ovens, fireplace doors and grates, and skylights. Tempered glass is also used for interior railings, display cases, office walls, and anywhere else where robust, durable glass is called for.

Steps to Temper Glass:

Glass tempering occurs following the fabrication process via the following steps.

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Working in the mining industry can be a dangerous place if you don’t know what you’re doing. Regular training is essential and understanding the machines you’re working near or operating plays an important role in all aspects of the industry.

Each type of mining equipment comes with its own set of mining activities. The most common types of Mining Equipments and Parts vary depending on whether the work is being carried out above or below ground or mining for gold, metals, coal or crude oil. From drilling machines to excavators, crushing and grinding equipment – the mining industry comes complete with all the right tools. New to the job and want to find out what it all means? Here’s a few of the industry’s most common types of equipment and why they’re important for the job.

Mining Drills

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Drills assist in creating holes descending underground. If miners are required to work underground, drills can also be used in ensuring the holes are large enough to serve as a portal for miners to enter. Directional drilling is also a type of mining technology where miners will use the tools and certain methods to drill wells.

 

Overview of Ball Mills

As shown in the adjacent image, a ball mill is a type grinding machine that uses balls to grind and remove material. It consists of a hollow compartment that rotates along a horizontal or vertical axis. It’s called a “ball mill” because it’s literally filled with balls. Materials are added to the ball mill, at which point the balls knock around inside the mill.

How a Ball Mill Works

Ball Mills work by using balls to grind materials. Materials such as iron ore, pain and ceramics are added to the ball mill. Next, the ball mill is activated so that it rotates — either on its vertical or horizontal axis. As the ball bill rotates, the balls bounce around while striking the enclosed material. The force of these strikes helps to grind the material into a finer, less-coarse medium.

For a ball mill to work, critical speed must be achieved. Critical speed refers to the speed at which the enclosed balls begin to rotate along the inner walls of the ball mill. If a ball mill fails to reach critical speed, the balls will remain stationary at the bottom where they have little or no impact on the material.

 

No industry puts its Pumps through the ringer quite like mining. When the price of commodities such as gold spike in the short term, there is no time to lose--companies have to act fast to extract whatever they can as quickly as possible. While this flurry of activity is great for stockholders, it is not ideal for equipment. Many pumps end up falling prey to a myriad of problems that range from corrosion to being crushed by heavier machinery. To protect mine dewatering pumps to the fullest extent, consider these six common threats that pumps may encounter during mining operations.

 

In the mining industry, Hydrocyclones are mineral processing equipment used in slurry pulps to separate coarse and fine particles according to their size and density. The mixture [slurry pulp] is injected into the hydrocyclone in such a way as to create the vortex and, depending upon the relative densities of the two phases, the centrifugal acceleration will cause the dispersed phase to move away from or towards the central core of the vortex.

Coarse particles exit the bottom of the device (underflow) while fine particles are carried by the central air column and exit at the top (overflow). In metal processing applications, the product stream is the overflow (fine particles) and is typically sent to flotation circuits. The product stream is the underflow (coarse particles), as fines are separated from the final product as a means of quality control.

While under certain conditions roping and plugging can occur where the hydrocyclones ceases to classify the particles, the shapes of the discharge are visibly different than normal operating conditions.

The roping condition occurs when the amount of solids in the underflow increases to such a point that its discharge velocity is limited, resulting in the accumulation of coarse solids in the separation chamber. This mass passes through the vortex, causing the inner air core to collapse and the discharge at the apex to take the form of a solid stream (rope) consisting of coarse material with high solids density. Roping conditions reduce recovery rates and efficiency in metals processing and lead to quality losses in copper processing.

 

Industrial Conveyor and Parts have many different designs and uses. Common types are belt, roller, motorized roller and overhead conveyors. We categorize them as floor style (mounted on the floor) or overhead. Use them to move products, create buffers and deliver products in sequence for a production line.

HOW ARE CONVEYORS USED?

Manufacturing engineers include conveyors in their production facilities for many reasons:

Moving products from point A to B (to avoid wasted time walking, or to reduce movements of forklifts, etc)

  • To carry products that are too heavy to for team members to lift

  • To move a product while operators are working on it (or adding to it). Like a final assembly conveyor at an auto plant

  • To avoid injury to workers from repetitive movement. Or to prevent damage to products caused by movement

  • To deliver products to a robot for processing. Or to receive products from a robot that are ready for the next step

 

Polyurethane & rubber Tensioned Screen Mats provide high wear and corrosive resistant screen media for all applications, from scalping to dewatering. Tensioned Screen Mats are available in a wide range of apertures and shore hardnesses.

Tensioned Screen Mats provide superior screening efficiency over conventional screening media, with substantially lower noise levels compared to standard woven wire screens.

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